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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 51 (some duplicates have been removed)
a moment. eddie phillips is here. he is up here. right here in the front. virginia harmon, where are you? she is with sfmta. then we have maria cordero. and sheila evans. are they here? they are representing the sfmta. next up, harbaugh alan kelly, jr., batting for the p.u.c. commission. following him, we have edgar lopez, future building manager in construction design. thank you. tiffany, i don't see her. she may be joining us later. she is the newly a.ed director of the san francisco redevelopment agency. for those who don't know her, she has a very intimate understanding of the portfolio that the redevelopment agency has been managing. >> jeff newmeyer. did i say that correctly? >> good. >> he is with the san francisco international airport. next up we have barbara smith -- no, we actually have domenica henderson from the san francisco housing authority, one of our community leaders. we have rhonda simmons, who heads up the office of work force development. rhonda, give a wave to the people. thank you. do we have a representative from america's cup? the port authority, the port? [inau
to turn it over, i believe, to virginia, and i will be available for questions during the q & a. [applause] >> hi. good afternoon. i am virginia harmon, and i am here on behalf of our director of transportation, ed risken. as most of you are aware, the transportation agency is the seventh largest transit agency in the country. therefore, there are a significant number of opportunities on our contracts and the employment opportunities associated with those contracts as well. >> i'm sure most of you are aware that we are currently bidding and working on the central subway project. that is an exciting opportunity for small businesses. to date we have also exceeded 30% participation in terms of small business enterprises on that project. we have done a couple of small business enterprise set-asides. on our tunnel contract upcoming, the work will start shortly. we have 50% s.b.e. trucking set aside. that should ensure we see a significant amount of small and local trucking on that project. i have brought a couple of people with me here today. i would like to introduce them to you and have them
. she played a trip to virginia, and the federal highway was looking at the program that our small business and disadvantaged business had put together as an example of how the out reaches should be done and how we can make these works available to everyone who is willing to participate. this chart, which is put together, paul has been working with us very closely. there are a number of elements that have to be in place for us to make sure that we understand what opportunities are available. we monitor what is out there in construction and what we are actually performing. to do all of that, to make sure that we do make the connection between the larger prime contractors and the smaller firms either on tasks, trucking and providing supplies, or on actual construction of a major construction contract. paul has been instrumental in making sure that all of that data does come to us, because we do report all of that, not just locally here, but state-wide, and also since our contract has federal money and stimulus money, all of our reports do go to the federal highway administration. go
. please do it share this information with other merchants in the area. we have virginia from the office of small business. we have roger from the bar association. no carla johnson from the office of disability. -- we have carla johnson from the office of disability. i want to especially it acknowledge my colleague to help us get the resources and brought legal expertise to the table. i do not want to take too much of your time. thank you for coming. >> thank you, supervisor chu. i want to express my admiration for a supervisor chu's commitment to you. so, from our office, what we heard, many small businesses were receiving lawsuits regarding it the ada. tonight we will hear about the legal requirements, what has been in place. any small businesses that nderst informed as far as their obligations for the ada, there are the mechanisms to provide that information to you. so, we are tasked with providing the information. there have been about 300 small businesses that have received the lawsuits. knee individuals who use this mechanism and come up -- the individual to use this mechanism. whi
like the guy who he was talking about out of virginia who had the large tumor in his brain and chose to act on but didn't have control over having the tumor in his brain. how do we take account for that in law? that's, i think, the interesting struggle that neuroscience presents us with, but it doesn't change the issue of free will. in fact, we have just as robust of evidence from neuroscience that supports this concept of action which is what we punish for in law to begin with. >> and, doctor, would you like to comment on that last? >> no. [laughter] >> i would like to raise an issue. theoretically, that may all be true. there is a problem in distinguishing and differentiating those who are compelled to act from, based on their desires and those who are not. and so if you can't define and it's not just simply defining in the brain, but it's defining it genetic, environmentally, contextually, you're defining it in terms of time, if you study their brain today but they committed the act six months ago, a year ago or 10 years ago, so the legal question ultimately is not theoretically w
out of virginia, that the vast majority of people who have a tumor like that who may have preferences and desires to act on sexual impulses don't. though we may not know in any particular case whether a person is an automoton, usually you can. the law has a bright line. it says if you engage in a wongful action, there is a defense called the insanity defense which never works as most of us know because we don't recognize it. should we recognize it, that's an interesting question. should we have a more robust concept of diminished responsibility in light of the understanding that some people have less control over their preferences and desires or should we have better sentencing schemes or get rid of incarceration and come up with different models of trying to deal with punishment once we understand people have wrong selections. i think those are all interesting questions, but is there free will? well, the fact that almost everybody in the audience raised either their right or left hand contemplated it and were quickly able to act and respond. that to me says, yes, there is. now what d
acronyms mean. >> sounds good. thanks, mark, virginia, and leader pelosi for putting on this event, and for all that she has done -- thanks mark, regina , and later pelosi. we have been able to access resources through the sba and the cdfi fund which helps get money to small businesses in this time of need. opportunity fund is not a bank or a government agency. we are an independent nonprofit organization with a mission to provide capital to working people to help them earn, say, and invest in the future. we focus primarily on businesses that are not yet bankable. most of our clients are themselves low or moderate income people or working in low or moderate income neighborhoods. but not exclusively. we will look at any business we think can bring about substantial community benefits. i want to talk about what type of loans we make and whatever products we have. that is
mississippi, south carolina, west virginia, wyoming, iowa, all of which use this mid deem charge rather than felony. and what we find in these 13 other states is that there are higher rates of drug treatment participation, lower rates of drug use, and even slightly lower rates of violent and property crime. so again, we can prove we can have safer communities. and then of course there are the unintended consequences of a felony conviction. consequences that really can cause great damage to a young life for many decades out. the very three things that can keep someone successfully in his or her recovery, access to housing, education and employment are put farther out of reach because of a felony conviction, especially in a down economy, someone with a felony has great difficulty even accessing 5 a job that pays minimum wage. putting these felony convictions to a whole population of young people, we really perpetuate a chronic underclass which benefits none of us. and then of course there's the inequity in the criminal justice system. even though we can show that drug use rates are quite simil
start to do that. we can start to categorize people. we categorized a group of individuals in virginia and said those people who have mental retardation have lesser couple ability for a whole host of reasons, they're more likely to follow people. they're more likely to be subject to peer pressure, less likely to have made premeditated decision-making. that's probably where this evidence is the most useful. we have a standard in criminal law called the reasonable person standard. this fictitious person that we measure everybody's conduct by. we say this is the person, the average person, the average juror, the average individual, the kind of conduct that we would expect an average member of society to live up to. well, as it turns out that none of us are quite average, right. and we might actually be much more like people who we share particular brain structures with or people who we share particular environmental and brain similarities to. so we might need to start thinking about more particularized notions of conduct based on what we would expect of a person who has that type of brain
california, virginia, ireland, right? most of the kids in the room are looking at me saying that it is kind of boring. they can get a server in beijing. what difference does it make year or $3,000 buys 10,000 computers for 30 minutes. nobody has ever been given 10,000 computers for 30 minutes for $3,000. it is in the question that they looked at me at that stage and went, "what would i do with that?" that is the seat of the next step. there are lots of examples already happening around us, but this is the magic. as soon as the smart kids out there start figuring out what you do, we ignite this thing with a rocket ship. this has nothing to do with total cost of ownership or any of that. it has to do with being able to do things we economically could never do before. i will conclude i see the floor. >> thank you, tim. simon. >> well, now you know all about how computing. [laughter] let me give you a slightly different angle. i think of the cloud as being roughly categorized into two worlds. there is the clout as envisaged and manifested within the enterprise, which includes the city of santa
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 51 (some duplicates have been removed)